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1. Belakovskaia,A (2350) - Arribas,M (2280) [A80]

Erevan Olympiad (11), 1996
[Anjelina Belakovskaia]


1.d4 f5     2. Bg5 g6    3. Nc3 With the idea 4. e4 3...d5    4. h4 Bg7     5. e3 5. h5?! h6 6. Bf4 g5    5... h6    6. Bf4 Nf6    7. Nf3 Be6    8. Ne5! Bf7
9. g4! Nbd7    10. gxf5 gxf5    11. Nxf7 Usually, in a closed position, knights are better than bishops, but this draws the king out.
11... Kxf7    12. Qd3 e6    13. 0 0 0 a6    14. f3 c5

15. e4!     The logical follow-through to open up the position, and get the bishops into the game. 15...cxd4     15...Nh5!? 16.Be3     16.exd5 Of course not 16.Qxd4 because of 16... 16...Nxe4! 16... e5     Black wisely avoids 16...dxc3 17.dxe6+ Kxe6 18.Qc4+ Ke7 19.Bd6+ Ke8 20.Qe6+ Qe7 21.Qxe7#

17. Qxf5 dxc3 

18. Rg1! Nf8 If 18...Qb6!?     19.Qg6+ Ke7     20.Qxg7+ Kd8 (20...Kd6 21.Bxe5+!+-)     21. Qxh8+ Kc7     22. Bxe5+! Nxe5     23. Qg7+ Ned7     24. Qg3+ and the g1 rook is protected, so White can just grab the pawn on c3. 19. d6 Rc8     20. Bxe5 cxb2+     21. Kb1 Rg8 If 21... Qd7 then 22. Rxg7+ wins. 22. d7 Rc6     22... N8xd7     23. Qg6+ Ke6     24. Bh3+ Kxe5     25. Qf5#

 

23. Bc4+! Rxc4 If 23...Ne6 then 24.Qg6+ Kf8 25.Bd6+ wins.     24. Bxf6 Qxf6

25. Rxg7+ A cute finish is 25.d8N+!     25... Kxg7     26. Qxf6+

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2. Belakovskaia,A (2350) - Foygel,I (2450) [A56]

New York Open (9), 1996
[Anjelina Belakovskaia]


1. d4 Nf6     2. c4 c5     3. d5 e5     4. Nc3 d6     5. g3 White are going tp play Bh3 and forcing an exchange. Their strategy is based on the rule: if you have pawns on white squares you don't need the bishop, which runs on the same squares. 5... g6 6.h4! This anticipates kingside castling for black and prepares an attack. 6...Bg7     7.Bh3 Bxh3     8.Nxh3 Nbd7     9.e4 One more pawn to the white squares + classical blockade of the e5 pawn by Nimtsovich's advice. 9...0 0 10.g4! White are running for an attack, because their king doesn't have a good place to stay. The question is: "Who will be the first?" 10...h5     11.f3 a6     12.Nf2 b5! Sacrificing a material for the initiative. 13. Ne2! bxc4     14. Ng3 Rb8     15. Qe2! c3     16. bxc3 Qa5     17. Nd1 c4! One more poisoned sacrifice! With the clear idea to open the queen side or move Nd7-c5-d3. 18.gxh5 Nc5 After 18... Nxh5     19. Nxh5 gxh5     20. Rg1 f5     21. Bh6 Rf7     22. Qg2 black can't survive.;     18... gxh5     19. Nf5+- 19. h6! Nd3+     20. Kf1 Nxc1?! 20... Bh8! with the idea 21. h5?! (21. Bg5!?) 21... Nf4! 21. Qe3! Nd3     22. hxg7 Kxg7     23. Nf5+ After 23... gxf5 24. Qg5+ black can't avoid mate. If 23... Kg8 24. Qh6 Ne8 25. Ne7 mate.

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3. Thompson,B - Belakovskaia,A [E99]

New York Open (1), 1994

1. d4 Nf6     2. Nf3 g6     3. c4 Bg7     4. Nc3 d6     5. e4 0-0     6. Be2 e5     7. 0-0 Nc6     8. d5 Ne7     9. Ne1 Nd7     10. Be3 f5     11. f3 f4     12. Bf2 h5     13. a4 a5     14. Nd3 b6     15. b4 axb4     16. Nxb4 Nf6     17. Nb5 Bd7     18. Nd3 g5     19. Be1 Ne8     20. a5 Rf6     21. axb6 cxb6     22. Bf2 Rxa1     23. Qxa1 Rg6     24. Qa3 Nc8     25. Na7 g4     26. Nxc8 g3     27. Nxb6 Qh4     28. hxg3 fxg3     29. Bxg3 Qxg3     30. Rf2 Bh3     31. Ne1 Bh6     32. Bd3 Be3     33. Qa2 Bxg2

0 - 1



4. Heaton,W - Belakovskaia,A [E60]

National Open (4), 1995

1. d4 Nf6     2. Nf3 g6     3. c4 Bg7     4. g3 0-0     5. Bg2 c5     6. 0-0 cxd4     7. Nxd4 Nc6     8. Nc2 d6     9. Nc3 Be6     10. b3 Qd7     11. Re1 White believe that they have a good centralized position. Black can't play 11...Ne4 because of 12. Nxe4 Bxa1 13. Nxa1 (rook a1 is protected!).

However, I look in the different direction - white king attracts my attention. Check my next three moves to see how quiet black pieces suddenly became wild!
11... Bh3!     12. Bh1 Ng4!     13. Bb2 Qf5! Massive attack is coming from nowhere.


14. f3

"Hey, what do you want from me?" - asking the white player. "I'll kick all your pieces back, where they just were." 
"Well, may be this is what you wish, but I am not the one who likes to move pieces back!" - would be my reply. My pieces are quite powerful and I don't mind to calculate 17(!) moves ahead, to prove it :)

14... Qxc2! 15. Qxc2 Bd4+

16. e3 Nxe3     17. Qf2 Nc2     18. Qxd4 N6xd4     19. Rxe7 Nxa1

20. Nd5 This loses even faster. Main variant of my calculation started with sacrifice 14 ... Qxc2  would be 20.Bxa1 Rfe8     21.Rxe8 Rxe8     22.Ne4! Kf8!!     23.Bxd4 f5     24.Ng5 Re1+     25.Kf2 Rxh1     26.Nxh3 Rxh2+     27.Kg1 Rxh3     28.Kg2 Rh5     29.Bxa7 f4!     30.Bb8 Ke7-+ 

(As I recall, this is the longest variant I ever calculated over the chess board).

20... Nac2     21. g4 Rfe8

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5. Belakovskaia,A (2354) - Ritvin,S (2267) [A57]

World Open (9), 1997
[Belakovskaia, A]


1. d4 Nf6     2. c4 c5     3. d5 b5     4. cxb5 a6     5. Nc3 axb5     6. e4 b4     7. Nb5 d6     8. Bf4 Nbd7     9. Nf3 Nb6     10. Nfd4!N cxd4     11. Qc2 If I play 11.Rc1 with the idea 11...Qd7 12.Nc7 Kd8 13.Na8 Na8 14.Qd4 Black has strong answer: 11... Nfd5! 12.ed Nd5. 11...Qd7 12.Nc7+ Kd8 13.Nxa8 Nxa8 14.Rc1 Bb7 15.Bd2 e6 16.Bxb4 exd5 17.Ba5+ Ke7 17... Ke8?! 18.a4 and 19.Bb5     18. exd5 Nxd5     19. Bc4 Nf4     20. f3 d5     21. Bd3 Kf6 Or 21...Qe6 22.Kd1! (of course not 22. Kf1? Nd3 23.Qd3 Ba6 +)     22. 0-0 Bd6 23. Qf2 Be5 23...Nd3 24.Qd4 Ne5 25.f4 24. Qh4+ g5     25. Qh6+ Ng6     26. g3 Nc7     27. f4 gxf4     28. gxf4 Qg4+     29. Kh1 Ne6     30. fxe5+ Kxe5     31. h3!! Qg3     32. Rf5+ Kd6     33. Bb4+ Kd7     34. Bb5+ Kd8     35. Rxf7 Bc6     36. Bxc6

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